A quick visit to Historiska Museet in Stockholm.

Last week I had the opportunity to do a quick visit to Stockholm and as such I naturally did what anyone would do, I spent the evening at The Swedish History Museum (Historiska Museet). Because, luckily enough, the museum had extended opening hours on a weekday that coincided (promise!) with my visit in Stockholm. As such, I spent the evening hours walking around in their exhibitions. It was a good time, I especially liked the iron age ceramics as well as the viking exhibition. I appreciated the opportunity to see source material in real life and especially some of these well debated findings; yes, I am thinking of the silver top that was presumably a part of a hat. There was a guided tour happening just at that display when I passed it so I didn’t have a good opportunity to photograph it, you can check it out here though.

When visiting museums I often think that “I don’t need to take pictures because there is a better picture of this somewhere else” but I have realised that I appreciate the pictures afterwards even though they might be shaky and out of focus. My photos are certainly not top quality but they kind of makes all the difference in the end on what I remember and what not. I’ll share some of the pictures I liked here because, as anyone with a pinterest account has discovered by now, there are a very finite number of pictures of available source material online so it’s nice to see something from a different angle for once. Remember though that they are taken through a glass window of the display with my cell phone and under less than perfect circumstances.

 

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Iron age: Cup from Halland.

 

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Viking age: Silver and rock crystal from Gotland.

 

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Viking age: Silver bracelets from Gotland.

 

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Viking age: Brooch, lunula pendant, belt end, pendant and earrings.

 

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Viking age: Glass beads from Gotland.

 

In order to support the museum and to get some decent pictures of the findings, I bought three booklets about their exhibitions and a bag with valkyries on it. Support your local museums!

I also happened to see some findings that I have replicas which is always fun! The findings were displayed in the museum but the since it was kind of troublesome to take pictures due to the lightning and display cases, I compare the replicas with pictures of the findings from the booklets instead. I really appreciate the effort people go through in creating replicas, especially when they look this good.

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Viking age: Brooch from Uppland (Adelsö Björkö Bj 463).

 

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Viking age: Amulet from Östergötland (Hagebyhöga 36:1).

 

Note the differences in source material and replicas; I dare say we sure are fond of symmetry nowadays. I try to keep this in mind when working with reenactment, to not be bothered by asymmetry and ease up in our strive for perfection. Somehow, it’s more difficult than I would care to admit, especially when it comes to your own work.

There turned out to be a lot of viking items in this post but I enjoy the pre-christian designs and expressions. Not trying to be rude but I think there is a limited number of times that you can depict iconic bible moments and still keep it interesting. The amount of bible depictions in the source material for the medieval times and the 14th century clearly surpasses that number. On the other hand, this gives us some context so I guess it might be a good thing. Ah well.

Unfortunately enough, the textile department of the museum was closed at the time of my visit so I’ll have to revisit again at another time. But if nothing else, check out their database that I used to find information of all the above material; I’ll definitely keep this in mind in the future, extremely handy!

All in all, go visit The Swedish History Museum (Historiska Museet) in Stockholm if you have the opportunity to do so! They have a lot of nice things.

 

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